Speakers

Learn more about the speakers at this years Quantum Technology in an Australian Context Symposium below

Dr. Len Sciacca

Next generation Technologies, the defence White paper and Symposium Overview

Summary: Under the 2016 Defence Whitepaper a significant investment in next generation technologies is foreshadowed. One of the next generation technologies identified in the 2016 Defence Whitepaper is quantum technologies. An indication of which quantum technologies are currently being considered for investment by Defence will be discussed.

Bio: Dr. Len Sciacca FTSE FIEAUST has over 30 years research and industrial experience in embedded real-time control and computing, sensor design, sensor networks and senior management roles in Government and industry sectors. He has worked for CSIRO at the Parkes Radio-Telescope; the Universities of Newcastle and Melbourne and was Technical Director of TUNRA. He was instrumental in the development of the Earth Station satellite tracking systems industry in South East Asia having developed expertise in the design and operations of large steerable antennas and satellite tracking products. In the mid 90’s he held positions in DSTO leading distributed sensor systems and advanced radar signal processing. He established the Centre of Expertise in Networked Decision and Sensor Systems with The University of Melbourne in sensor networks and research in adaptive sensor design with important military and civilian outcomes. He has worked for Tenix Electronic Systems, developing new approaches to industry R&D portfolio management.

From 2002, Len was Chief of the Electronic Warfare and Radar Division of the Defence Science and Technology Group leading a research Division of over 200 scientists, engineers and technicians. He led substantial multi-million dollar international collaborations, industry alliances and the commercialisation of innovative technologies. He was invited to chair and conduct two reviews of the US Naval Research Laboratories. Len is currently Chief Science Partnerships and Engagement leading industry, university and international partnerships in defence science along with science communications and STEM outreach. Len helped establish and was Director of the Defence Science Institute based in Victoria which facilitates collaborative programs between universities, industries and research agencies in Australia and overseas.

Len is a Fellow of the Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering and Fellow of Engineers Australia. He was Chair of the Australian Research Council College of Experts for Mathematics, Information and Communication Sciences.

Len obtained his BE from QUT and his ME and PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Newcastle, NSW.

Dr. Gerry Borsuk

Quantum information technology at the US Naval Research Laboratory and the Quantum Science and Engineering Program of the three US Service Laboratories

Summary: Current research work on quantum information science and technology at the Naval Research Laboratory will be discussed including work on quantum dots, defect state qubits and atoms. A large program of the US Office of the Secretary of Defense involving the three Service Laboratories (Army, Navy, Air Force) called ‘Quantum Science and Engineering Program’ will also be described.

Bio: Dr. Gerald M. Borsuk is the Associate Director of Research for Systems at the Naval Research Laboratory. He provides executive direction and leadership to four major NRL research divisions that conduct a broad multi-disciplinary program of scientific research and advanced technological development in the areas of optics, electromagnetic warfare, information technology, and radar. He is also the Focus Area Coordinator for all NRL Base programs in electronics science and technology. Prior to his appointment as Associate Director of Research for Systems, Dr. Borsuk served for 23 years as the Superintendent of the Electronics Science and Technology Division at NRL, where he was responsible for the in-house execution of a multi-disciplinary program of basic and applied research in electronic materials and structures, solid state devices, nanometer scale electronics, vacuum electronics, and circuits. He is a Fellow of the IEEE. He has published in the literature and has been awarded several patents. He is the recipient of four Presidential Rank Senior Executive Awards, the most recent of which was the Distinguished Rank Award granted in 2010. Amongst his other recognitions for achievement, he is the recipient of the IEEE Frederik Philips Medal, the IEEE Harry Diamond Memorial Award, the IEEE Millennium Medal, and an IR-100 Award. Dr. Borsuk has served on the University of Maryland National Security Advisory Board. He also served on the Editorial Board of the IEEE Proceedings for eighteen years.

Dr. Tom Reinecke

Quantum information technology at the US Naval Research Laboratory and the Quantum Science and Engineering Program of the three US Service Laboratories

Summary: Current research work on quantum information science and technology at the Naval Research Laboratory will be discussed including work on quantum dots, defect state qubits and atoms. A large program of the US Office of the Secretary of Defense involving the three Service Laboratories (Army, Navy, Air Force) called 'Quantum Science and Engineering Program' will also be described.

Bio: Dr. Tom Reinecke is the Senior Scientist for Nanoelectronics and Head of the Quantum Effects and Modeling Section at NRL. He received his PhD with distinction from Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar in condensed matter theory. He has done wide-ranging research in the optical and transport properties of solids state materials and nanoscience. He has published more than 250 journal articles with important contributions including quantum information science and technology, thermoelectrics and high thermal conductivity materials for cooling and power generation, and monolayer materials technology. He is the POC for quantum information science and technology at NRL and developed the Tri-Service Quantum Information Science and Engineering Program for OSD. He has been PI on wide ranging programs for internal and external sponsors. He has been a visiting scientist at a number of leading research institutions, including the Max-Planck Institute for Solid State in Germany and the Universities of Würzburg, Stuttgart, and Dortmund in Germany. Awards include Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Humboldt Prize for senior scientists from Germany, the E. O. Hulburt Award, the Sigma Xi Award for Basic Research, the Presidential Meritorious Rank Award from President Bush, the Presidential Distinguished Rank Award from President Obama, and the Navy Outstanding Scientist and Engineer Award.

Dr. Craig Hoffman

Quantum information technology at the US Naval Research Laboratory and the Quantum Science and Engineering Program of the three US Service Laboratories

Summary: Current research work on quantum information science and technology at the Naval Research Laboratory will be discussed including work on quantum dots, defect state qubits and atoms. A large program of the US Office of the Secretary of Defense involving the three Service Laboratories (Army, Navy, Air Force) called ‘Quantum Science and Engineering Program’ will also be described.

Bio: Dr. Craig Hoffman is the Superintendent of the Optical Sciences Division at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. In this capacity he manages a broad research portfolio aimed at developing optical components, materials, and systems for the Navy. Dr. Hoffman received his Ph.D. in physics from Brown University in 1979 and began his research career at the lab in 1981. He has since been widely recognized as an expert in narrow-gap semiconductor physics and IR sensor susceptibility & hardening, among other topics, and has published over 100 articles in the general area of optical physics. Dr. Hoffman is a fellow of the Optical Society of America, as well as a member of the IEEE, SPIE, and Sigma Xi research societies. He is currently serving as the Navy’s program manager for the Quantum Information Science and Engineering Program.

Prof. Michelle Simmons

Creating a quantum information ecosystem in Australia

Summary: This talk will discuss our international leadership in quantum information and put the Centre’s research into context of why Australia is uniquely positioned to create a highly competitive, internationally connected quantum technology industry base

Bio: Professor Simmons is an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow & Director of the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology. Following her PhD in solar engineering at the University of Durham in the UK in 1992 she became a Research Fellow at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, UK, working with Professor Sir Michael Pepper FRS in GaAs-based quantum electronics. In 1999, she was awarded a QEII Fellowship and came to Australia where she pioneered unique technologies internationally to build electronic devices in silicon at the atomic scale, including the world's smallest transistor, the narrowest conducting wires and the first transistor where a single atom controls its operation. This work opens up the prospect of developing a silicon-based quantum computer: a powerful new form of computing with the potential to transform information processing.

Professor Simmons is one of a handful of researchers in Australia to have twice received a Federation Fellowship and now a Laureate Fellowship. She has won both the Pawsey Medal (2006) and Lyle Medal (2015) from the Australian Academy of Science for outstanding research in physics and was, upon her appointment, one of the youngest fellows of this Academy. She was named Scientist of the Year by the New South Wales Government in 2012 and in 2014 became one of only a few Australians inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has recently become Editor-in-Chief of Nature Quantum Information and in 2015 was awarded the CSIRO Eureka Prize for Leadership in Science.

Prof. lloyd Hollenberg

Creating a quantum information ecosystem in Australia

Summary: This talk will discuss our international leadership in quantum information and put the Centre’s research into context of why Australia is uniquely positioned to create a highly competitive, internationally connected quantum technology industry base

Bio: Lloyd is the Deputy Director of the Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow, and the Thomas Baker Chair at the University of Melbourne. He completed his PhD in theoretical particle physics in 1989 and moved fields to quantum information in 1999. He is known internationally for his theoretical and experimental work on the design and development of quantum technology using spins in semiconductors. His important contributions include the development of quantum computer architectures and device concepts based on donors spins in silicon, and quantum sensors/imaging systems based on defect centres in diamond. He was awarded the 2012 Australian Institute of Physics Walter Boas Medal, the 2013 Victoria Prize for Science and Innovation (Physical Sciences), and he led the team which won the 2013 Eureka Prize for Interdisciplinary Research for the first measurement of quantum sensors in a living cell.

Prof. Andrew White

Engineered quantum systems: principles and applications

Summary: I will define, by examples, the concept of an engineered quantum system  focussing on engineering function through the control of quantum coherence. I will give examples of near-term applications including sensors and simulators.

Bio: Professor Andrew White, School of Mathematics and Physics, UQ, has conducted research on various topics including shrimp eyes, nuclear physics, optical vortices, and quantum computers. He likes quantum weirdness for its own sake, but his current research aims to explore and exploit the full range of quantum behaviours — notably entanglement — with an eye to engineering new technologies and scientific applications.

Andrew is the Deputy Director at the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS) and Program Manager at the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computing and Communication Technology (CQC2T).

Prof. David Reilly

Engineered quantum systems: principles and applications.

Summary: I will define, by examples,  the concept of an engineered quantum system  focussing on engineering function through the control of quantum coherence. I will give examples of near-term applications including sensors and simulators.

Bio: Professor David Reilly is an experimental physicist working at the interface of quantum science, nanoscale condensed matter systems, and cryogenic electronics and hardware. Professor Reilly completed his Ph.D at UNSW in 2002 on correlated electron phenomena in low-dimensional nanoelectronic devices. From 2005-2008 he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University with Professor Charlie Marcus, working on spin qubits. He returned to Australia in 2008 to lead a new research group, the Quantum Nanoscience Laboratory, in the School of Physics at Sydney. He is a member of the Quantum Science Group in the School and a CI in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems.

Prof. Andre Doherty

Engineered quantum systems: principles and applications.

Summary: I will define, by examples,  the concept of an engineered quantum system  focussing on engineering function through the control of quantum coherence. I will give examples of near-term applications including sensors and simulators.

Bio: Professor Doherty is recognised internationally for his innovative contributions to theoretical physics. He is one of the pioneers of the field of quantum control and has made seminal contributions to quantum information theory. In quantum control he was the first to apply ideas from classical control which is ubiquitous from aircraft to precision measurement to the science of quantum systems. This work was a very early forerunner of the current experimental and theoretical programs in the control of quantum systems. Professor Doherty's work emphasised that adaptability and feedback would be essential to any quantum technology and was ahead of its time in emphasising the need to begin engineering quantum systems. Professor Doherty is well known for his extensive collaborations with experimentalists in wide range of systems from quantum optics, including cavity QED and optomechanical systems, to condensed matter, including circuit QED and semiconductor quantum dots.

Dr. Cathy Foley

CSIRO’s development of superconducting quantum devices

Summary: This presentation will outline CSIRO capability in superconducting quantum device and system  development. It will cover a range of devices that have been designed, fabricated and tested in a range of applications. This will be mostly high temperature devoices but will also outline the CSIRO low temperature device fabrication. It will also provide an overview of the issues that need to be addressed to achieve broader adoption.

Bio: Dr Cathy Foley, Deputy and Science Director of CSIRO Manufacturing, has made distinguished contributions to the understanding of superconducting materials and to the development of devices using superconductors to detect magnetic fields and locate valuable deposits of minerals. Cathy is also the Chair of the Australian National Fabrication Facility Victorian Node Collaboration Committee and the ARC Steel Hub Advisory Committee as well as sitting on several other committees and boards. Dr Foley has made significant contributions to the scientific community as president of several scientific societies and as a member of committees such as PMSEIC giving advice to Government on scientific and technological matters. Cathy was awarded the `Woman of the Year’ by the NSW Government in 2013 and the International IEEE Award for Continuing and Significant Contributions to Applied Superconductivity 2014. In 2015 was awarded the Clunies Ross Medal of the Australian Academy of Technological Science and Engineering and Australian Institute of Physics’ Outstanding Service to Physics Award. As a leader in CSIRO Manufacturing, Cathy is working to help existing Australian manufacturers to transform to be globally competitive by engaging with Australian researchers and to build new companies to assist with the translation of research for economic prosperity.

Prof. Andre Luiten

New Spectroscopic Protocols for Unravelling Complex Spectra

Summary: Spectroscopy is a key technology for both fundamental and applied science. A long-held desire has been the development of a means to continuously acquire broadband spectral data with either high time or frequency resolution. I will discuss the use of frequency combs to achieve this aim - either using imaging technology to take high-resolution broadband spectra in a fraction of a second, or the use of electro-optical combs and fast acquisition to acquire spectra with high spectral resolution on the microsecond timescale

Bio: Prof Andre Luiten (FAIP) is Director of the Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS) and Chair of Experimental Physics at the University of Adelaide. He is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Physics. Prof Andre Luiten obtained his PhD in Physics from the University of Western Australia in 1997, for which he was awarded the Bragg Gold Medal. He has subsequently held three prestigious Fellowships from the ARC. For his efforts Andre was the joint inaugural winner of the WA Premier’s Prize for Early Career Achievement in Science. Andre came to the University of Adelaide in 2013 to take up the Chair of Experimental Physics and a South Australian Research Fellowship from the Premier’s Research and Innovation Fund. He published 6 book chapters and authored 94 journal papers (with ~2,000 citations) and over 100 conference papers, and has raised over $15.5M for research. Prof Luiten’s work has aimed at the development of state-of-the-art instruments across many diverse fields of physics. He is particularly excited by the possibility of applying these instruments to solve problems, or to make measurements that were not previously possible. In recent times his group’s focus has broadened to include more practical measurements for assisting industry.

Prof. John Close

Precision Inertial Navigation with cold atoms and atom lasers

Summary: This talk is an introduction to inertial navigation using ultra cold atoms. I will discuss gyroscopes, accelerometers and gravimeters and  their relationship to atomic clocks. I will present our recent results on simultaneous state-of-the-art, absolute gravimetry and magnetic gradiometry. Our focus in this work is the production of field deployable inertial sensors and  their application, in the field, to inertial navigation in the absence of GPS signals.

Bio: Professor John Close completed his Phd in physics at the University of California Berkeley in 1991 and then continued to positions at the University of Washington in Seattle and the Max Planck Institute in Göttingen. He was awarded a Queen Elizabeth II Fellowship in 2000 at the Australian National University and became a full Professor at theANU in 2008. he has been Deputy Director of the Research School of Physics and Engineering at ANU since 2012. Professor Close is currently a member of the ARC College of Experts.  His research interests and experience are in Bose Einstein condensation and atom lasers and their application to precision inertial measurement and navigation.

Mr. Dilan Rajasingham

Quantum Computing capturing our imagination

Summary: Quantum Computing has the potential to be a game changing technology in Australia. Through our relationship with UNSW, it has inspired us at the Commonwealth bank to think about what a new future could be, and what opportunities there exist to prepare ourselves for it.

Bio: Dilan Rajasingham runs an innovation fund and leads a Technology Innovation team that explores, experiments with and is involved in the implementation of “over the horizon” disruptive or transformative technologies for the Commonwealth Bank. His focus is on technologies that will change the way we do business to better meet our customers’ evolving needs. He is also passionate about innovating to better our world.

Dilan’s focus areas include big data, cyber, identity, blockchain, smart machines, the Internet of Things, Ag-tech, and next-generation compute, including platforms and atomic computing (e.g. quantum computing).

Dilan has a deep technical skillset in strategy, architecture and technology implementation across multiple industries, as well as a proven ability to build impressive global networks of collaborators to commercialise concepts and technology. As a highly engaging and practiced speaker, he is often called upon to help explain abstract ideas, complex technologies and their social implications in a simple way.

My Shaun Wilson

Taking a Systems Engineering Approach to Quantum Computing Software

Summary: QxBranch, an advanced data analytics firm based in Washington DC and Adelaide, has been developing applications and underpinning software systems to support the commercial adoption of quantum computing. This talk explores the role of software and simulation as an integral part of the quantum computing business case, and the role of systems engineers in linking industry needs and the scientific community’s development of quantum hardware.

Bio: Shaun is the Chief Executive Officer of systems engineering house, Shoal Engineering, where he leads a team of professionals with broad experience and expertise in developing and employing a range of complex systems. He is a practicing systems engineer with particular expertise in aerospace modelling and simulation and conceptual design. His experience spans from aerospace and defence to mining and leisure sports. Shaun sits on a range of company boards, holds multiple degrees, and is published in several technical fields.

Mr. Dan Padilha

Taking a Systems Engineering Approach to Quantum Computing Software

Summary: QxBranch, an advanced data analytics firm based in Washington DC and Adelaide, has been developing applications and underpinning software systems to support the commercial adoption of quantum computing. This talk explores the role of software and simulation as an integral part of the quantum computing business case, and the role of systems engineers in linking industry needs and the scientific community’s development of quantum hardware.

Bio: Dan is an aerospace engineer and computer scientist working as a Systems Engineer for QxBranch, a data analytics firm specialising in complex software engineering and quantum computing expertise. Dan has been working to develop software stacks for existing and future quantum computing hardware, with the aim to rapidly introduce these technologies to industry. He also has experience in machine learning and data analytics, and prior experience developing secure embedded real-time operating systems.

Mr. Duncan Fletcher

Taking a Systems Engineering Approach to Quantum Computing Software

Summary: QxBranch, an advanced data analytics firm based in Washington DC and Adelaide, has been developing applications and underpinning software systems to support the commercial adoption of quantum computing. This talk explores the role of software and simulation as an integral part of the quantum computing business case, and the role of systems engineers in linking industry needs and the scientific community’s development of quantum hardware.

Bio: Duncan leads QxBranch's team of software engineers, computer scientists, mathematicians, and physicists on data analytics, software development, and quantum computing projects. His expertise is in high-performance computing application development, probabilistic risk analysis, simulations, associated software. A well-published author in aerospace modelling, simulation, and quantum computing applications, Duncan is currently also the Lead for Constructive Simulation Systems in the Weapons & Combat Systems Division of Australia's Defence Science and Technology Group, and Lead Engineer for the Department of Defence's leading desktop missile and engagement performance analysis simulator.

Mr. Robert Wilson

Quantum Technology in Financial Services

Summary: Exploring the opportunities that Quantum Technology creates in Financial Services, and how these may shape the business of tomorrow.

Bio: Robert is a technologist and a banker with in excess of 25 years of global experience with a number of first class institutions, both financial services and technology. Within Westpac he is responsible for Group Technology Strategy & Architecture, which includes Enterprise, Infrastructure and Solution Architecture, Solution Consulting, Transformation, Governance, Planning, Risk and Information Security (CISO).

Prior to joining Westpac he was responsible for the Global Retail Banking line of business with SAP, a global leader in business and banking software & innovation. Prior to this Robert held the role of Global Head Strategic Engagements which entailed the management of SAP’s largest customer transformation programmes in Banking, including Commonwealth Bank as Program Director.

Before joining SAP he managed a start-up in a Swiss Re, McKinsey joint venture supporting innovation in digital credit management & securitisation, and for 11 years with a European headquartered global bank, holding a number of senior management functions in Asia, the US & Europe, including Emerging markets, Corporate finance, Treasury and Payments.

Robert is actively engaged in driving transformation through new business models. He also has broad experience in systems strategy & development, architecture, integration and global systems deployment.

Robert is actively engaged in driving transformation through new business models. He also has broad experience in systems strategy & development, architecture, integration and global systems deployment.

Educated in Australia, Europe and the US, he holds an Economics degree from University of NSW, with executive study in Europe & the US. Robert is married and has one son.

Dr. Vikram Sharma

Towards Enduring Trust: A journey from the Lab to Market-Leading Cyber Security solutions.

Summary: This talk aims to share highlights of the journey to translate world-leading Australian research to advanced, market-relevant cyber security solutions. It also touches on the important partnerships that have played a critical role in shaping QuintessenceLabs' evolution.

Bio: Vikram Sharma is the Founder and CEO of QuintessenceLabs. Recognising the potential of quantum security in the early 2000s while in California, Vikram sought to commercialise the technology, returning to the Australian National University to work with the Quantum Optics Group in the Department of Physics. QuintessenceLabs emerged from the world-leading research conducted by the group, and is today positioned at the forefront of the cyber security sector. The company's capabilities have been recognised at several Australian and international events, most recently: judged as global runner-up from a pool of 2,500+ companies in IBM's SmartCamp competition in 2013, named by the Australian Information Industry Association as Australia’s most innovative small company in 2014, and selected by the Security Innovation Network as one of its SINET16 Cyber Security Innovators in 2015.

Prior to QuintessenceLabs, Vikram had 20 years’ experience in building and managing technology companies. He founded several successful start-up ventures in the information technology services and hardware spaces including a consulting company providing IT services to the Federal Government in Australia, and one of India’s first private ISPs. Vikram holds a master of science in computer science from The Australian National University, a master of science in management (Sloan Fellow) from Stanford University, and a doctorate in quantum physics from The Australian National University. He was presented the Pearcey State Award for Entrepreneurship in 2013.

Prof. Neil Stansfield

The UK Ministry of Defence Quantum Technologies Programme

Summary: The presentation will provide an overview of the UK national Quantum Technologies programme (QTP) before focusing on the UK Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) QTP which sponsors a number of projects, including the development of: miniature atomic clocks; an imaging device using gravity sensors and a quantum navigator.

Bio: Neil Stansfield is Head of the Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) newly formed Centre of Excellence for Technology Innovation: the Knowledge, Innovation, and Futures Enterprise. The Centre is focussed on the following three modes of ‘challenge led activity’:

The grand challenge, which tackles important and complex issues for Defence and Security.

Compelling narrative on future challenges of and from Science and Technology.

Internal challenge to ensure that the £1-2 billion translational research investment from MOD is most effectively targeted

Neil read for his first degree in Chemistry with Mathematics at the University of Birmingham. The early part of Neil’s career was spent in scientific research in countering the use of weapons of mass destruction. This included supporting the United Nations Special Commission inspections in Iraq following the Gulf War, and developing IT methodologies to support these inspections.

During the early 1990’s Neil was involved in ballistic missile defence programmes, in collaboration with the US, as well as supporting the negotiation of the Chemical Weapons Convention, ratified in The Hague. Following this Neil led the UK efforts in demilitarisation of old and abandoned chemical weapons. This involved leading the UK work supporting the assistance of other nations, principally Russia, US, Japan and China in their programmes on demilitarisation of stockpile and non-stockpile chemical munitions. From 1999 to 2006 Neil led operating departments providing advice to MOD, firstly in chemical and biological defence and then across the maritime domain.

In 2007 Neil was a member of the Royal College of Defence Studies, MOD’s flagship development opportunity for senior leaders. Working at the strategic level, Neil broadened his expertise in wider security matters, and developed a worldwide network of contacts, as well as receiving an MA in International Relations. In January 2008, Neil became Head of the Delivery Unit for CONTEST, the UK Government’s Counter Terrorism Strategy, within the Office for Security and Counter Terrorism, and was Head of the Science and Technology Unit which was formed in Autumn 2009.

Dr. Hugh Bradlow

Why is a telco interested in quantum computers?

Summary: Quantum computers represent a radical change in direction for information technology. They challenge our intuition in both the way they are constructed and the information processing that they provide. However, they hold out the promise of future brain-scale computing so potentially can radically influence the direction of human development. In this presentation, we discuss why Telstra is interested in quantum computers, the applications and services that we hope to see emerge and the challenges that we face on the journey.

Bio: Professor Hugh S. Bradlow is Chief Scientist at Telstra Corporation in which capacity he acts as advisor to the CEO and the Board and other parts of the business on longer term technology directions and technology disruption.

Before joining Telstra in September 1995, Professor Bradlow was Professor of Computer Engineering at the University of Wollongong in Australia and Professor of Electrical Engineering (Digital Systems) at the University of Cape Town.

Professor Bradlow is a graduate in electrical engineering from the University of Cape Town in 1973 and received the D.Phil. degree for research in experimental nuclear physics from the University of Oxford. He is a Fellow of and on the Board of the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering, an Emeritus Professor of the University of Wollongong, a Professorial Fellow of the University of Melbourne, and a recipient of a Centenary Medal from the Commonwealth of Australia. He was elected as the joint 2009 Australian Telecommunications Ambassador of the Year. He was listed in the 2010 and 2011 Global Telecom Business Power 100 rankings and was named by Smart Company as one of the 12 most influential people in Australian ICT.

Prior to becoming Chief Scientist he was Chief Technology Officer and Head of Innovation, responsible for investigating the future technologies that will impact Telstra’s business.

Before joining Telstra in September 1995, Professor Bradlow was Professor of Computer Engineering at the University of Wollongong in Australia and Professor of Electrical Engineering (Digital Systems) at the University of Cape Town.

Prof. Robert Scholten

Australian industry, quantum and classical

Summary: Quantum technology is heavily dependent on classical instrumentation, particularly electronics and lasers. Australia has outstanding capabilities in both. We have the ideas and initiative to lead, not just in the physics of quantum algorithms and qubit implementions but also through sophisticated enabling instrumentation. How can Australia compete globally? Quantum technology labs all around the world already rely on high-value exports from MOGLabs and other Australian photonics companies. Let’s consider how we can grow that share of the next technological revolution.

Bio: Robert Scholten is a Professor of Physics at The University of Melbourne, where he leads two research projects exploiting the quantum physics of laser-atom interactions. In the first, lasers are used to cool and trap atoms to microKelvin temperatures, then to excite and ionise those atoms to generate ultracold electrons and ions for nanoscale imaging and fabrication. The second project uses lasers to excite defect colour centres in diamond, to investigate the quantum Berry phase for rotation, and as the basis of a magnetic tensor gradiometer. His research career began with studying electron collisions from laser-excited atoms, where laser polarisation was used to control the quantum state of the target atoms. His interest in laser-atom interactions formed the basis of later research, for example using atom-optics techniques for nanofabrication as a Fulbright Postdoctoral Research Fellow at NIST in the USA. The technical demands of achieving competitive research results has led to development of advanced laser and electronic instrumentation, underpinning formation of a high-tech start-up company in 2007. MOGLabs designs, develops and manufactures lasers and sophisticated electronics in Melbourne and exports globally, with offices in Berlin and the USA and distributors in Japan, Korea, China, Vietnam and Israel.

Prof. Terry Stevenson

Quantum Technology Applications in Raytheon

Summary: The presentation will provide a brief overview of work at the Raytheon BBN facilities in Cambridge, Boston, involving quantum computing and quantum encryption; BBN’s entry into the quantum area was initially through the encryption area to provide secure communications to the US DoD.

Bio: Terry Stevenson is the Chief Technology Officer of Raytheon Australia

As the Chief Technology Officer, Terry is responsible for the introduction of new technology, the promotion of innovation, research and development, and the execution of all aspects of engineering across the business enterprise. This includes the development of engineering skills, capability development and the processes to meet the changing needs of the product lines.

Terry is also responsible for and manages Environmental Health and Safety as well as Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI®) activities across the company.

Before joining Raytheon Australia, Terry was Technical Director of Boeing Australia for more than six years and before this he was with Stanilite Electronics for three years, initially as the Data Communications Manager and then Group Engineering Manager. He also ran his own consultancy while on the staff of the University of Technology Sydney for six years.

Terry graduated from the New South Wales Institute of Technology with a Bachelor of Electrical Engineering degree and from the University of Technology Sydney with a Doctorate in Telecommunications. He has also completed an MBA through Queensland University of Technology and is an adjunct professor at the University of Queensland.

Over the past decade he has been actively involved with the promotion of innovation, as a member of the NICTA Business Evaluation Committee, the support of small-to-medium enterprises, and the development of creative skills in young engineers. He currently sits on a number of business and academic advisory boards and, in 2010, was Engineers Australia’s Eminent Speaker, which enabled him to promote engineering to the next generation of engineers across Australia.

Research interests include, systems thinking, systems complexity and innovation. He also holds a joint international patent in spread spectrum communications.

Prof. Boyce Russell

UNSW Canberra Space - the capability for in-orbit S&T, including quantum technologies.

Summary: UNSW Canberra has invested $10M in developing the team and capabilities needed for performing in-orbit space research and technology demonstration. This includes activity for space-related applications of quantum technologies including quantum communications. The presentation will discuss the latter in the context of the broader UNSW Canberra Space program.

Bio: Professor Russell Boyce holds the position of Chair for Space Engineering at UNSW Canberra, where he directs UNSW Canberra Space. He brings to this role a research approach developed throughout 25 years in the field of hypersonics, coupling computational and experimental research with flight testing, most recently via the SCRAMSPACE scramjet flight experiment program which he led as Chair for Hypersonics at the University of Queensland. UNSW Canberra Space has built a substantial team and capability for in-orbit space research - both science and technology. Professor Boyce also chairs the Australian Academy of Science's National Committee for Space and Radio Science, sits on the Executive Council of the Space Industry Association of Australia, and is an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

Prof. Mike Tobar

Precision Measurement, Sensing and Frequency Metrology: Tools for Future Technologies and New Tests of Fundamental Physics

Summary: A variety of precision experiments at UWA, which utilise photons, phonons and electrons will be introduced. Pushing these technologies to operate with quantum limited precision and beyond allows new tests of fundamental physics as well as new technologies for future applications.

Bio: Professor Michael E. Tobar received the Ph.D. degree in physics from the University of Western Australia, Perth, W.A., Australia, in 1993. He is currently a Professor of Physics with the School of Physics at the University of Western Australia. Notably, between 2009 and 2014 He was awarded a Laureate Fellowship by the Australian Research Council.

His research interests encompass the broad discipline of frequency metrology, precision measurements and quantum and low temperature physics. He has co-authored about 250 journal publications in these fields of research and has 11 patents. Over his career he has used his expertise to undertake some of the best test of fundamental physics, and adapted such technology to the commercial sector. This includes the highly successful low noise room temperature and cryogenic sapphire oscillators as well as new sensor technologies developed within the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems. He is also the focal point of Australian participation in space experiments involving precision clocks and oscillators.

Recent awards include the 2014 Cady Award presented by the IEEE, the 2014 Clunies-Ross award presented by the Australian Academy of Science and Technology, the 2012 Alan Walsh medal presented by the Australian Institute of Physics, the 2009 Barry Inglis medal presented by the National Measurement Institute for precision measurement, the 2006 Boas medal presented by the Australian Institute of Physics. Also, during 2007 he was elevated to Fellow of the IEEE, 2008 the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering and 2012 the Australian Academy of Science. He also received a citation from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council for inspiring research students to reach their full potential and transform to successful research scientists through participation in ground-breaking research.

Prof. Ping Koy Lamb

Extending QKD beyond the city radius & Laser levitation for sensing

Summary: 1. Extending QKD beyond the city radius.

One of the goals of CQC2T is to build a quantum repeater that will enable extending the quantum communication range of quantum key distribution beyond a city radius. In this talk, we present our roadmap that will integrate noiseless linear amplification and quantum memory into an entanglement based communication system for long range QKD.

2. Laser levitation for sensing.Radiation pressure can be use to levitate a macroscopic object. When operating in the optical spring regime, a laser levitation setup can turn into a high Q opto-mechanical harmonic oscillator. I will discuss the possible uses of this laser levitation platform.

Bio: Ping Koy Lam completed his BSc with a double major in Maths and Physics from the University of Auckland in 1990. He worked as a process engineer for Sony (audio electronics) and Hewlett-Packard (semiconductor LED) for 3 years prior to his post-graduate studies at the ANU where he obtained an MSc in theoretical physics, and a PhD in experimental physics. He was awarded the Australian Institute of Physics Bragg Medal and the ANU Crawford Prize for his PhD in 1999. Ping Koy was an Alexander von Humboldt fellow at the Erlangen-Nürnberg Universit.t in 2000 and a CNRS visiting professor at Paris University in 2007. He was awarded the 2003 British Council Eureka Prize for inspiring science (quantum teleportation) and the 2006 UNSW Eureka Prize for innovative research (quantum cryptography). Ping Koy is the chief scientist and co-founder of QuintessenceLabs Pty. Ltd, a spin-off company of his group that commercialises quantum communication technology.

Ping Koy’s research interests include quantum optics, optical metrology, nonlinear optics and quantum information. Within the Centre, he manages the ANU node and is the quantum communication work package leader. His research covers quantum key distribution, quantum memory, quantum repeater and optical quantum information processing. He has published more than 170 scientific articles with more than 30 papers appearing in Physical Review Letters, Science and the Nature suite of journals. His research expertise is in the field of quantum optics and metrology.